A little tea with your bullshit?

A blog for the critical steampunk

Queries? Factoids? Points of contention? Don't be shy!
7:47 AM
February 1st, 2014

Anonymous wrote...
Do you have any tips on writing a Victorian era character?


fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment:

Well, my own advice would be: read books that were written in the Victorian period…! This is where you get the best look at their society and societal expectations. My best recommendation would be A.S. Byatt’s Possession. You can’t go wrong with most of the classics either.

Otherwise, look below. Shout out to The Writing Café and their flawless tagging system.

General:

Language:

Society:

Books/Information:

Best of luck…!

- enlee

12:45 PM
December 25th, 2013

equinoxparanormal:

Krampus is Comin’

'Tis the season to be jolly….Christmas is a time of celebrations, good food, and warm cheer. Anticipation of Santa with his sack stuffed of presents excites children worldwide. In the meantime, they are reminded to be good or they could end up with a lump of coal in their Christmas stockings.

He’s making a list,
And checking it twice;
Gonna find out
Who’s naughty and nice. 

He sees you when you’re sleeping.
He knows when you’re awake.
He knows if you’ve been bad or good,
So be good for goodness sake!
Oh, you better watch out!

 Oh, you better watch out! The young in Austria, Germany & Switzerland have known these words very well. It is a warning…and they tremble at the mere mention of Krampus, a malevolent and devilish creature, complete with large horns and hoofed feet. Whereas the Western version of Santa Claus is in charge of both rewards and punishments for good and bad children respectively, the Alpine Saint Nicolas only distributes rewards while Krampus delivers the punishments.


The name “Krampus” is derived from the old German expression for claw,’ referring to the menacing appearance of the creature.’ Depending on the area where the celebrations are taking place, the creature’s name and appearance can vary slightly. Unlike our tradition of Santa delivering presents in the wee hours the morning of December 25th, the European Saint Nicolas visits children on December 6th, which commemorates the original real-life saint’s day. According to the customs, Krampus tags along with Saint Nicolas or precedes him on December 5th to deliver punishments to bad children on this day. The practice dates back several thousands of years ago when supposed witches or troublemakers would don sinister costumes and run around the streets to scare the townspeople. Later, the pagan religions observed the approach of the harsh winter season in a similar manner with actors dressed in creepy costumes. Drawing from this influence, Krampus costumes today can range from a scary-looking old man mask to a horrific devil-like creature covered in dark fur, bearing a long-fanged grimacing mask and animalistic eyes. They wield an assortment of fear-inducing noise-makers, such as heavy chains, whips and loud, clanging bells, as well as a basket meant to carry away naughty children.

Take a look at the above vintage images. It may give you a better perspective.

Continue reading at Phantoms and Monsters…

12:45 PM
November 14th, 2013
steampunkxlove:

thewritingcafe:

Guide to Writing Steampunk
BASICS

Punk Genres: most common genres are in italics


Atomicpunk: Optimistic retro science fiction based on the Space Age. Think The Jetsons.
Biopunk: This genre is about altering genetics and DNA. These stories often take place in the near-future in which humans have been altered or in which human experimentation is common.
Candlepunk: Similar to clockpunk, but darker and with less technology.
Clockpunk: Think Da Vinci’s inventions, but more advanced while. This genre follows the aesthetics and technology of Western civilization during the mid to late middle ages, though sometimes it’s set in the Victorian era.
Cyberpunk: Has advanced technology and often focuses on artificial intelligence and the cyber world. The setting is often near-future rather than far-future. Blade Runner is an example.
Dieselpunk: Based on aesthetics and technology between World War I and World War II, sometimes up until the Cold War.
Decopunk: Ranges from the aesthetics of the 1920’s to the 1950’s. Decopunk aesthetic is heavily based on modernism. Less gritty than dieselpunk.
Elfpunk: Basically urban fantasy, but with common high or epic fantasy creatures put in an urban setting rather than vampires and werewolves.
Nanopunk: Similar to biopunk, but biotechnology is less available and nanotechnology is common.
Sandalpunk: Set in ancient worlds, such as Rome, but with advanced technology.
Splatterpunk: Extremely graphic and contains a lot of gore.
Steampunk: This genre gets its name from the heavy steam-powered technology involved. Aesthetics are based on the Victorian and industrial eras of the Western world, though other cultural elements may be used.
Western Steampunk: Similar to steampunk, but with Western (as in Wild West) aesthetics and settings.
So why are there so many sub genres? For starters, they help agents and publishers get an idea of what they’re in for if you’re going through the traditional publishing route. While bookstores usually just put these genres within science fiction or fantasy, you can still market your book through sub genres to reach a specific group of people who are looking for these genres. However, there are a lot of sub genres, most of which many have not heard of. If you’ve written one of these genres and intend to publish it, the best would be to put it under another name (with the exception of steampunk, cyberpunk, and biopunk). For example, if you have written a candlepunk story, you can propose it as fantasy, alternate historical fiction, or any other genre it may fit in. While atomicpunk is quite common, it’s not well known by that name. If you have written an atompunk story, the best way to market it would be to call it retro science fiction. But what’s the difference between punk genres and historical fiction? The technology is a big difference. It’s usually more advanced for the time it’s modeled after.
 
TECHNOLOGY

The technology is one of the defining aspects of steampunk. It’s the basis for the world you’re writing in. For the typical steampunk story, technology will be (of course) steam powered.
 


A Guide to Steampunk Gadgets and Technology
Airship
Steampunk Airships Inspiration
Steampunk Blimps
Technology Steampunk Instructables
Steampunk Technology Inspiration
How Steampunk Works
Steampunk Gadgets
100 Functional Steampunk Gadgets

CHARACTERS & FASHION

Another defining feature of steampunk is the aesthetics and the characters. Steampunk takes the latter part of the word (punk) to mean the opposition of the mainstream, though that’s not always necessary in your story.

Research jobs common in the Victorian age and add steam to it. Your characters will revolve around their setting and their clothing may be a part of that too.


Steampunk Archetypes
Steampunk Clothing References
Steampunk as Aesthetic
Steampunk Character Inspiration
Steampunk Character Building
Characters, Personalities, and Personas

READING

Best Steampunk Books
Steampunk
Best Steampunk and Gaslight
Favorite Steampunk/Alt History
Best Fantasy, Steampunk, and Science Fiction BDSM
Asian Steampunk
Buttkicking Female Steampunk
Best Steampunk YA Books
Best Unknown Steampunk
Steampunk Adventures
Gay Steampunk
Best Vampire Steampunk
Steampunk Novels and Short Stories
Best of Cyberpunk
Best Cyberpunk Books
Books with Cyberpunk Themes
Books About Video Games and Virtual Reality

MORE
Researching Steampunk
A Brief Introduction to Steampunk
Steampunk Tropes
What is Steampunk?
So You Want to: Write a Steampunk Story
Steampunk Inspiration
8 Tips and Tricks Every Steampunk Writer Should Know
Writing Steampunk Fiction Tips
Kady Cross Shares her Secrets to Writing Steampunk
Tips for Successfully Creating Steampunk
Steampunk Wiki
List of Writing Steampunk Resources
Steampunk: a List of Themes
How to Write Steampunk
Writing Steampunk
Tips for Writing Steampunk
CYBERPUNK
Cyberpunk
Technology in Cyberpunk
Cyberpunk Technology
History of Cyberpunk
Cyberpunk Esstentials
What Happened to Cyberpunk?
Cyberpunk Fashion (2) (3) (4)
Cyberpunk Attitude

HEY LOOK ANON. :3


steampunkxlove:

thewritingcafe:

Guide to Writing Steampunk

BASICS

Punk Genres: most common genres are in italics

  • Atomicpunk: Optimistic retro science fiction based on the Space Age. Think The Jetsons.
  • BiopunkThis genre is about altering genetics and DNA. These stories often take place in the near-future in which humans have been altered or in which human experimentation is common.
  • Candlepunk: Similar to clockpunk, but darker and with less technology.
  • ClockpunkThink Da Vinci’s inventions, but more advanced while. This genre follows the aesthetics and technology of Western civilization during the mid to late middle ages, though sometimes it’s set in the Victorian era.
  • Cyberpunk: Has advanced technology and often focuses on artificial intelligence and the cyber world. The setting is often near-future rather than far-future. Blade Runner is an example.
  • Dieselpunk: Based on aesthetics and technology between World War I and World War II, sometimes up until the Cold War.
  • Decopunk: Ranges from the aesthetics of the 1920’s to the 1950’s. Decopunk aesthetic is heavily based on modernism. Less gritty than dieselpunk.
  • Elfpunk: Basically urban fantasy, but with common high or epic fantasy creatures put in an urban setting rather than vampires and werewolves.
  • Nanopunk: Similar to biopunk, but biotechnology is less available and nanotechnology is common.
  • Sandalpunk: Set in ancient worlds, such as Rome, but with advanced technology.
  • Splatterpunk: Extremely graphic and contains a lot of gore.
  • Steampunk: This genre gets its name from the heavy steam-powered technology involved. Aesthetics are based on the Victorian and industrial eras of the Western world, though other cultural elements may be used.
  • Western Steampunk: Similar to steampunk, but with Western (as in Wild West) aesthetics and settings.
So why are there so many sub genres? For starters, they help agents and publishers get an idea of what they’re in for if you’re going through the traditional publishing route. While bookstores usually just put these genres within science fiction or fantasy, you can still market your book through sub genres to reach a specific group of people who are looking for these genres.
 
However, there are a lot of sub genres, most of which many have not heard of. If you’ve written one of these genres and intend to publish it, the best would be to put it under another name (with the exception of steampunk, cyberpunk, and biopunk). For example, if you have written a candlepunk story, you can propose it as fantasy, alternate historical fiction, or any other genre it may fit in. While atomicpunk is quite common, it’s not well known by that name. If you have written an atompunk story, the best way to market it would be to call it retro science fiction.
 
But what’s the difference between punk genres and historical fiction? The technology is a big difference. It’s usually more advanced for the time it’s modeled after.
 
TECHNOLOGY
The technology is one of the defining aspects of steampunk. It’s the basis for the world you’re writing in. For the typical steampunk story, technology will be (of course) steam powered.
 
CHARACTERS & FASHION
Another defining feature of steampunk is the aesthetics and the characters. Steampunk takes the latter part of the word (punk) to mean the opposition of the mainstream, though that’s not always necessary in your story.
Research jobs common in the Victorian age and add steam to it. Your characters will revolve around their setting and their clothing may be a part of that too.
READING

MORE

CYBERPUNK

HEY LOOK ANON. :3

(via clevergirlhelps)

4:30 PM
November 5th, 2013
anachronistichybrid:

[source]


12:45 PM
November 5th, 2013
Welcome to Fuck Yeah Character Development: iliehan said: Do you have a guide on how old handguns work, for...

fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment:

iliehan said: Do you have a guide on how old handguns work, for example from the 19th century? Or are there barely differences to the modern ones?

Sorry, I just saw this. There are differences between 19th century guns and modern firearms. Here are some resources to get you started:

8:16 PM
November 4th, 2013
gearsandsteam:

(via The Makeup Siren makes Steampunk Go Bollywood)


4:31 PM
November 4th, 2013
Not really steampunk but I can’t stop staring at it o__o.


Not really steampunk but I can’t stop staring at it o__o.

(Source: cardiostimulator)

12:45 PM
November 4th, 2013
allonsyraerae:


"You’re lucky I don’t mind fixing things…"


I DID IT. I FINISHED IT. AAAAAH.


allonsyraerae:

"You’re lucky I don’t mind fixing things…"

I DID IT. I FINISHED IT. AAAAAH.

3:30 PM
November 3rd, 2013
Let Me Explain to You a Thing: Writing Research: American Frontier (The Wild West)

ghostflowerdreams:

The American frontier began with English colonial settlements in the early 17th century and ended with the admission of the last mainland territories as states in the early 20th century. Enormous popular attention in the media focuses on the western United States in the…

4:30 PM
November 1st, 2013

Steampunk Skullface - Matt Valentine


Steampunk Skullface - Matt Valentine

(Source: color-me-wiccan)